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Congress, Politics, Books
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First Ladies: Influence and Image - Book
  •  Library of Congress header image 
  • About the Documentary
     Jefferson Building 
    Documentary

    This program looks behind-the-scenes at the Library of Congress, allowing viewers to learn the history of the institution as they tour the Library’s iconic Jefferson Building and see some of the treasures found in its collections of rare books, photos, and maps. It will also feature a look at some of the presidential papers housed there, ranging from George Washington through Calvin Coolidge. Viewers will learn how the library uses technology to preserve its holdings and expand public access to them. It will also show how technology is helping to uncover new information about some of the items in its collections.
     
    Watch the documentary - complete version 
  • Interview
     Billington 
    Librarian Interview

    In connection with the making of “The Library of Congress,” James Billington sat down for an interview in his ceremonial office in the Jefferson Building. The discussion ranges from the philosophy of the Library to his favorite room in the Jefferson Building. Mr. Billington was sworn in as Librarian of Congress on September 14, 1987.
    Watch the video of the interview 
  • Previews
     Library of Congress Promotion 
    Previews

    In advance of the program’s premiere on July 18, C-SPAN viewers have an opportunity to see short sections of the program.
    Statistics about the library
    Maps from World War II
    Hyperspectral Imaging
    Personal Papers of famous people
    Reading Room and Great Hall architecture 
  • Library of Congress - Quiz
    1. Q: If you read a book a day, how many years would it take to read every book catalogued in the Library?
      A: It would take 60,000 yrs to go through all the books in the Library of Congress, at one book per day. http://youtu.be/-D8O8jIocJw 
    2. Q: If you spent just one minute looking at each photo, how many years would it take to look at every photo in the Library's collection?
      A: It would take you 24 years to see all the photos in the Library of Congress, at a photo per minute. http://youtu.be/-D8O8jIocJw 
    3. Q: From what country were the original Library of Congress books ordered in 1800?
      A: The original books in the Library of Congress came from England. http://youtu.be/hDf4Sw6OqC0 
    4. Q: The Library of Congress holds the personal records collections of how many members of Congress?
      A: The Library of Congress holds about 900 personal Congressional collections. http://youtu.be/aI_rNX43ERM 
    5. Q: How many presidential collections were housed in the Library of Congress prior to the advent of presidential libraries?
      A: Before the advent of presidential libraries, four presidential collections were housed in the Library of Congress. http://youtu.be/WuLqTukhpUM 
    6. Q: What did Library of Congress imaging analysis reveal about Thomas Jefferson’s penning of the first draft of the Declaration of Independence?
      A: Advanced Library of Congress imaging revealed the word “subjects” beneath the word “citizens.” http://youtu.be/WrWK06baBN8 
    7. Q: What makes one copy of Adolph Hitler’s Mein Kampf a most unusual possession of the Library of Congress?
      A: Hitler’s Mein Kampf at the Library of Congress is in Braille. http://youtu.be/f44pG0uvIgs 
    8. Q: Which photo does the Library of Congress consider its most famous?
      A: Migrant Mother, by photographer Dorothea Lange, is considered the most famous photo in the Library of Congress. http://youtu.be/7GrUhxImnBg 
    9. Q: The earliest map in the Library of Congress collection that has word “America” depicted on it was created in what year?
      A: The earliest map in the Library of Congress collection that has the word “America” depicted is from 1507. http://youtu.be/yM8MKVZcj_M 
    10. Q: What is the largest single collection ever acquired by the Library of Congress?
      A: The NAACP collection is the largest single collection ever acquired by the Library of Congress. http://youtu.be/SmwdKIma9ws