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"12 Years a Slave" & Solomon Northup's Descendants

1853 Engraving of Solomon Northup

1853 Engraving of Solomon Northup

Washington, DC
Sunday, March 2, 2014

This program features remarks by Vera Williams, Clayton Adams, and Justin Gilliam - three direct living descendants of Solomon Northup, whose life story is featured in the film "12 Years a Slave."

Updated: Monday, March 3, 2014 at 10:11am (ET)

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