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World War II Tuskegee Airmen

Washington, DC
Saturday, January 18, 2014

In 1941, the U.S. Army Air Corps trained a select group of enlisted African Americans to fly and maintain combat aircrafts during World War II. Based in Tuskegee, Alabama, they became known as the Tuskegee Airmen. Four of the original Airmen talk about the obstacles they faced as members of the first all-African American pursuit squadron.This event was part of the American Veterans Center Annual Conference held in November. 

Updated: Monday, January 20, 2014 at 10:48am (ET)

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