All Weekend, Every Weekend. On C-SPAN3.

World War II Tuskegee Airmen

Washington, DC
Saturday, January 18, 2014

In 1941, the U.S. Army Air Corps trained a select group of enlisted African Americans to fly and maintain combat aircrafts during World War II. Based in Tuskegee, Alabama, they became known as the Tuskegee Airmen. Four of the original Airmen talk about the obstacles they faced as members of the first all-African American pursuit squadron.This event was part of the American Veterans Center Annual Conference held in November. 

Updated: Monday, January 20, 2014 at 10:48am (ET)

Related Events

Serving in World War II
Friday, July 4, 2014     

Veterans of World War II talk about their wartime experiences. One served as a fighter pilot in the U.S. Army Air Corps and flew the last mission of the war on August 14, 1945. The other is Chester Nez, who died on June 4th, 2014. He was 93-years-old and the last surviving veteran of the original Navajo Code Talkers – a group of Navajo marines who created a secret military language used successfully during the war in the pacific and finally declassified in 1968. This event was part of the American Veterans Center Annual Conference. 

Reflections of World War II Veterans
Sunday, December 29, 2013     

Two World War II veterans reflect on their experiences in battle. The first was a gunnery officer on the USS Barb — a submarine responsible for sinking many enemy ships in the Pacific. We also hear from an Army soldier of the 2nd Ranger Battalion whose mission on D-Day was to destroy enemy munitions in France. This event was part of the American Veterans Center Annual Conference held in November 2013. 

Pacific Theater of World War II
Sunday, November 10, 2013     

In this program, hear from two World War II veterans about their experience in the Pacific Theater. Both of the men are U.S. Marines who fought in the Battle of Iwo Jima. They spoke at the American Veterans Center annual conference in Washington, DC.

Military Production During World War II
Monday, October 14, 2013     

Marine Corps War College strategic studies professor Jim Lacey talks about his book, “Keep From All Thoughtful Men: How U.S. Economists Won World War II.” He details the decisions economists and generals made to guide and sustain military production during the war. The New York Military Affairs Symposium and the Soldiers’, Sailors’, Marines’, Coast Guard and Airmen’s Club hosted this event.

Lectures in History: Women in the Workforce After World War II
Saturday, August 31, 2013     

University of Maryland professor Robyn Muncy analyses the lives of American women in the period after World War II through the late 20th century, focusing on their experiences in the labor market. Professor Muncy argues that women did not leave the workforce after World War II as popularly believed, but were forced out of the higher paying positions they acquired during the war and into lower paying jobs. The University of Maryland is in College Park.
 

World War II Battles of Midway & Guadalcanal
Saturday, August 17, 2013     

Historians debate the turning point in the Pacific theater during World War II. Craig Symonds argues the Battle of Midway was the decisive engagement that shifted momentum in the Allies favor, while Richard Frank asserts that the bloody campaign of Guadalcanal thwarted future Axis plans and resulted in a permanent blow to the Japanese war machine. The New-York Historical Society hosted this discussion.

Lectures in History: World War II
Saturday, February 23, 2013     

History professor Matthew O’Brien looks at the causes, major battles and repercussions of World War II. Professor O’Brien examines Hitler’s advance through Europe and Winston Churchill’s strategy to fight the Nazis. Also discussed are the failing of the Soviet Union’s non-aggression pact with Germany, and the eventual full participation of the United States in the war following the attack on Pearl Harbor. This class took place at Franciscan University of Steubenville in Ohio.

The Presidency: Ronald Reagan's Legacy
Sunday     

Former President Ronald Reagan died at 93 in June 2004. To commemorate the 10th anniversary, the Ronald Reagan Presidential Foundation and Library hosted a discussion about the 40th president’s legacy. Panelists included Reagan biographer Lou Cannon and Reagan speech writer Peggy Noonan.   

Reel America: "Oil Across Arabia" - 1950
Sunday     

This Bechtel Corporation film documents the 1947 to 1950 development of a Saudi Arabian oil pipeline constructed by American companies in cooperation with Saudi Arabia.  The 1,000 mile pipeline by-passed the need for a 3,000 mile oil tanker journey around Saudio Arabia to the Suez Canal. This pipeline ceased all operations in 1990.

Star-Spangled Banner 200th Anniversary
Sunday     

In this program, we take you to Fort McHenry in Baltimore for a ceremony commemorating the 200th anniversary of the Star-Spangled Banner. The event includes remarks by former Secretary of State Colin Powell. Also, a flag-raising at the exact time 200 years ago that Francis Scott Key saw a large American flag hoisted above the fort, signaling the garrison had survived an all-night bombardment by the British Navy. That moment on September 14, 1814, inspired Key to compose what would later become our National Anthem, and the American victory became a turning point in the War of 1812. 

Share This Event Via Social Media

Related Resources

American History TV