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World War II Reporting & Censorship

Ed Kennedy

Ed Kennedy

Washington, DC
Monday, May 28, 2012

The National Press Club hosted a discussion on World War II reporting and censorship, and the experience of Associated Press reporter Ed Kennedy.  Kennedy was fired after he defied a military embargo and reported Germany's surrender a day before the official announcement.

Updated: Friday, June 1, 2012 at 2:13pm (ET)

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