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World Views on Lincoln & Emancipation

Washington, DC
Saturday, July 6, 2013

A discussion examining world reaction to President Lincoln and the Emancipation Proclamation. Historian Richard Carwardine asserts that Lincoln became a polarizing figure abroad as the proclamation was viewed very favorably by some, but was viewed as a threat to others. This event was hosted by the Wilson Center in Washington, DC.

Updated: Saturday, July 6, 2013 at 2:27pm (ET)

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