All Weekend, Every Weekend. On C-SPAN3.

Women in the CIA

1952 image of CIA women office workers

1952 image of CIA women office workers

Northampton, Massachusetts
Monday, December 16, 2013

In this program, professor Brent Durbin details the history and impact of women in the CIA, from the Second World War to the present. Following his presentation, we hear from a panel of female CIA staff members who discuss their experiences working for the Agency. The panel highlights the efforts of senior staff to include more women in leadership roles, and the continuing challenges unique to women in the CIA and other intelligence agencies.

Updated: Friday, January 3, 2014 at 10:06pm (ET)

Related Events

Author and Professor Discusses Women in Conflict
Friday, February 22, 2013     

Clark University Professor Cynthia Enloe discusses the role women play in military conflicts and how more needs to be done to get them involved in preventing and resolving those conflicts.

Lectures in History: Women in the Workforce After World War II
Saturday, August 31, 2013     

University of Maryland professor Robyn Muncy analyses the lives of American women in the period after World War II through the late 20th century, focusing on their experiences in the labor market. Professor Muncy argues that women did not leave the workforce after World War II as popularly believed, but were forced out of the higher paying positions they acquired during the war and into lower paying jobs. The University of Maryland is in College Park.
 

History of Women’s Roles in American Finance
Saturday, November 9, 2013     

Sheri Caplan, the author of “Petticoats and Pinstripes: Portraits of Women in Wall Street’s History,” discusses how women played an important role in the development of American finance. She argues that World War I acted as the watershed moment for women who entered the financial world --- they saw it as part of their patriotic duty. This event took place at the Museum of American Finance in New York City.

Eleanor Roosevelt, JFK, and Women's Rights
Saturday, November 16, 2013     

In this program about the political career of Eleanor Roosevelt, we hear from her great-granddaughter, Tracy Roosevelt, and historian Allida Black. First Lady from 1933 to 1945, Eleanor Roosevelt continued in public service after she left the White House, and became a key player in John F. Kennedy's presidential campaign and administration. Kennedy appointed Roosevelt to chair a special Commission on the Status of Women. The Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard and the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library hosted the event.

The Presidency: Ronald Reagan's Legacy
Sunday     

Former President Ronald Reagan died at 93 in June 2004. To commemorate the 10th anniversary, the Ronald Reagan Presidential Foundation and Library hosted a discussion about the 40th president’s legacy. Panelists included Reagan biographer Lou Cannon and Reagan speech writer Peggy Noonan.   

Reel America: "Oil Across Arabia" - 1950
Sunday     

This Bechtel Corporation film documents the 1947 to 1950 development of a Saudi Arabian oil pipeline constructed by American companies in cooperation with Saudi Arabia.  The 1,000 mile pipeline by-passed the need for a 3,000 mile oil tanker journey around Saudio Arabia to the Suez Canal. This pipeline ceased all operations in 1990.

Star-Spangled Banner 200th Anniversary
Sunday     

In this program, we take you to Fort McHenry in Baltimore for a ceremony commemorating the 200th anniversary of the Star-Spangled Banner. The event includes remarks by former Secretary of State Colin Powell. Also, a flag-raising at the exact time 200 years ago that Francis Scott Key saw a large American flag hoisted above the fort, signaling the garrison had survived an all-night bombardment by the British Navy. That moment on September 14, 1814, inspired Key to compose what would later become our National Anthem, and the American victory became a turning point in the War of 1812. 

American Artifacts: Birth of the Star-Spangled Banner
Sunday     

In this "American Artifacts" program, we visit Fort McHenry National Monument & Historic Shrine in Baltimore to learn about the birth of the Star-Spangled Banner. The year 2014 marks the 200th anniversary of the British naval bombardment of the fort during the War of 1812. The raising of the garrison flag over the fort on the morning after the barrage inspired Francis Scott Key to write the words that later became our national anthem. 

Espionage During World War I
Saturday     

Former intelligence analyst for both the State Department and the CIA, Mark Stout, explores the history of espionage during World War I. He focuses on four American agencies that participated in spying; the Navy Department, the War Department, the State Department, and the Expeditionary forces abroad, including the U.S. Army. The Kansas City Public Library and the Truman Library Institute co-hosted this event.

Lectures in History: Korean War POWs
Saturday     

U.S. Naval Academy history professor Lori Bogle teaches a class on the American soldiers taken prisoner during the Korean War, including the effects of captivity and attempts at political indoctrination. 

Share This Event Via Social Media

Video Playlist

Photo Gallery

C-SPAN Radio