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War of 1812 Bicentennial: Vincent Vaise

Baltimore, Maryland
Wednesday, July 4, 2012

On June 18, 1812 the United States declared war on Great Britain.  Hostilities continued until the Treaty of Ghent was ratified on February 16, 1815.  From Fort McHenry National Monument & Historic Shrine in Baltimore, Maryland, Vince Vaise, chief of interpretation, discussed the fort bombardment and the creation of the Star-Spangled Banner.

Updated: Wednesday, June 27, 2012 at 3:44pm (ET)

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