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War Crimes Trial of Henry Wirz

Andersonville Prison Camp

Andersonville Prison Camp

Washington, DC
Saturday, July 26, 2014

Swiss-born Confederate Captain Henry Wirz was in charge of the Andersonville prisoner-of-war camp, where some 13,000 of approximately 45,000 Union prisoners died while being held there. Author and law professor Paul Finkelman discusses the military trial and execution of Henry Wirz and the concept of war crimes that were established as a result of the trial. This talk is a portion of the 2014 Civil War Symposium hosted by the U.S. Capitol Historical Society.

Updated: Sunday, July 27, 2014 at 11:43am (ET)

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