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Virginia & the War of 1812

USS Chesapeake (right) & British ship, HMS Shannon, June 1813

USS Chesapeake (right) & British ship, HMS Shannon, June 1813

Washington, DC
Saturday, September 14, 2013

Author and archivist Stuart Butler looks at events that unfolded in Virginia during the War of 1812, and examines how the state’s militia organized and defended Virginia against British attack. He highlights various assaults along the Virginia side of the Chesapeake Bay and discusses how slaves fought on behalf of the British military. The National Archives in Washington DC hosted this program.

Updated: Monday, September 16, 2013 at 10:04am (ET)

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Washington Journal (late 2012)
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