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Vietnam 1963: Revision & Reassessment

South Vietnam President Ngo Dinh Diem

South Vietnam President Ngo Dinh Diem

New York City
Saturday, February 1, 2014

In a panel titled, “Vietnam 1963: Revision and Reassessment,” four Vietnam War historians discuss the events of fifty years ago in what many consider a pivotal year in the conflict. They explore the political atmosphere in South Vietnam, the country’s changing relationship with the United States, and the uncertain future of the conflict during that year, which culminated in a military coup and the assassination of President Diem in November. The historians examine events through the perspective of Vietnamese and American leaders of the day.  This event was hosted by the New York Military Affairs Symposium in New York City.

Updated: Saturday, February 1, 2014 at 12:39pm (ET)

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In Depth: Joan Biskupic