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U.S. Supreme Court and the Constitution

Burt Neuborne

Burt Neuborne

New York City
Saturday, December 15, 2012

Civil libertarian and New York University professor Burt Neuborne speaks at Cooper Union about how Supreme Court justices interpret the constitution. He argues that when there is no precedent, judges often make decisions based on their values which, in the 21st century, usually coincide with their political affiliations.

Updated: Tuesday, December 11, 2012 at 12:13pm (ET)

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