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U.S. Institute of Peace Hosts Discussion on Religion & Violence

Washington, DC
Monday, October 22, 2012

In light of the recent violence in the Muslim world sparked by the release of a trailer for a U.S.-made anti-Islam film, the U.S. Institute of Peace hosted a discussion on religious bias, violence and coexistence.

Panelists, included Suzan Johnson Cook, ambassador at large for religious freedom at the State Department; Haris Tarin, director of the Muslim Public Affairs Council; Marc Gopin, Director of the Center for World Religions, Diplomacy, and Conflict at George Mason University; and Manal Omar and Susan Hayward of the U.S. Institute of Peace, discuss the conflicts between freedom of speech and freedom of religion, and how to work to promote tolerance for all religions.

The discussion focused on the recent changes in the Middle East and North Africa, and how U.S. Diplomacy can be used to promote peaceful discourse on religion and speech.

 

Updated: Monday, October 22, 2012 at 12:15pm (ET)

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