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U.S. Fugitive Slaves in Mexico

Atlanta
Sunday, June 8, 2014

From the Organization of American Historians 2014 annual meeting in Atlanta, a conversation with Mekala Audain about the U.S. fugitive slaves who escaped to Mexico in the 19th century. 

Updated: Tuesday, June 10, 2014 at 11:39am (ET)

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