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U.S. Congress at 225 Years

Federal Hall, New York City

Federal Hall, New York City

Washington, DC
Saturday, April 5, 2014

The First Congress met 225 years ago in 1789, working to implement the Constitution and shape a new government. Charlene Bickford of the First Federal Congress Project and Christine Blackerby of the Center for Legislative Archives tell the story of the first meeting of the U.S. Congress in New York City, and explain how documents of the First Congress were found and preserved. The event was hosted by the Senate Historical Office and the Association of Centers for the Study of Congress. 

Updated: Monday, April 7, 2014 at 11:09am (ET)

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