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U.S. Capitol Dome Restoration

Washington, DC
Saturday, January 18, 2014

Reporters in Washington, DC were recently given a tour of the U.S. Capitol dome, which is undergoing a complete restoration. The cast iron outer shell of the dome has more than 1,000 cracks caused by aging and weather. Kevin Hildebrand from the U.S. Capitol Architect’s office explains the restoration process and gives reporters an inside look at how the dome was built over the original that sat on top of the capitol building. 

Updated: Monday, January 20, 2014 at 10:50am (ET)

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