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U.S. Capitol Art of the American Revolution

"Declaration of Independence" by John Trumbull, 1819

Washington, DC
Sunday, January 5, 2014

In this program we look at art in the U.S. Capitol depicting the American Revolution. The chief of art and archives at the U.S. House of Representatives, Farar Elliott, analyzes the images of key Revolutionaries -- especially George Washington -- and profiles the artists behind the iconic paintings.

This event was hosted by The Society of the Cincinnati in Washington, DC, which was founded in 1783 by Continental Army and French officers who served together in the American Revolution.

Updated: Tuesday, January 7, 2014 at 11:15am (ET)

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