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Truman's Decision to Use the Atomic Bomb

Nagasaki, Japan  August 9, 1945

Nagasaki, Japan August 9, 1945

Washington, DC
Sunday, August 24, 2014

Panelists debate whether the use of the atomic bomb was morally sound, necessary to end the war, or the first shot of the Cold War. With thousands of combatants and civilians dying each month, President Truman faced an ethical dilemma – as he put it – about “which innocents to save.” This event was co-hosted by the Harry S. Truman Library and Museum and the Truman Little White House – and was part of the 2014 Truman Legacy Symposium. 

Updated: Sunday, August 24, 2014 at 3:59pm (ET)

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