All Weekend, Every Weekend. On C-SPAN3.

Triangle Shirtwaist Fire Remembered

New York City
Saturday, May 11, 2013

On March 25th, 1911, a fire at New York City’s Triangle Shirtwaist Factory took the lives of 146 garment workers, most of them young immigrant women. The tragedy led to many changes in New York’s labor laws and building regulations. From New York’s Lower East Side Tenement Museum, journalist & novelist Kevin Baker talks with four relatives of Triangle Shirtwaist garment workers about how their ancestors died or survived, and about efforts to memorialize the victims. This program was co-hosted by the Remember the Triangle Fire Coalition.

Updated: Sunday, May 12, 2013 at 9:35pm (ET)

Related Events

The Triangle Shirtwaist Fire of 1911: A Centennial Remembrance
Saturday, March 19, 2011     

On March 25, 1911, fire raced through the 8th, 9th and 10th floors of the Triangle Waist Company in New York City. Inside, workers – largely young immigrant women in their teens and twenties – made the fashionable shirtwaists. Fire ladders and water hoses did not reach beyond the 6th floor. The flames, locked doors and blocked exits trapped workers – and many jumped to their deaths. In all, 146 died. A look back at the tragedy that prompted calls for safety investigations and labor reforms, and that encouraged union organizing efforts.

Battle of Bladensburg & Burning of Washington
Today     

A panel of authors and scholars looks back 200 years to the Battle of Bladensburg and the Burning of Washington, DC, which took place August 24, 1814, during the War of 1812.

American Artifacts: Burning of Washington River Tour
Today     

Steve Vogel, author of "Through the Perilous Fight: Six Weeks that Saved the Nation" tells the story of the August 24, 1814 burning of Washington by taking us on a river tour with his boat.  Mr. Vogel argues that the waterways were key to the British commanders, who thought that capturing and burning the city might bring the War of 1812 to an end.

The Life of Milton Friedman
Today     

Economist Mark Skousen reflects on the life of Nobel Prize winning economist Milton Friedman and his contributions to the study of economics – especially his work to re-establish the American economy following World War II. Skousen also reflects on his personal relationship with Friedman and the economist’s influence on his own career. The Kansas City Public Library hosted this event. 

Historical Accuracy of the Movie “Lincoln”
Friday     

Dickinson College professor Matthew Pinsker dissects Stephen Spielberg’s movie “Lincoln,” analyzing what is fact and what is Hollywood fiction. Professor Pinsker goes into detail about the historical significance of the events the movie portrays, but also highlights areas where Mr. Spielberg exercised his artistic freedom. This talk is a portion of the 2014 Civil War Symposium hosted by the U.S. Capitol Historical Society. 

British Burning of Washington
Thursday     

Two hundred years ago on August 24th, 1814, British soldiers routed American troops at the Battle of Bladensburg just outside of Washington, DC. The victory left the nation’s capital wide open to British forces, who marched into the city and burned down the White House and U.S. Capitol building. In this program, learn more about the Burning of Washington during the War of 1812 from author and historian Anthony Pitch at an event hosted by the Smithsonian Associates. 

The Civil War: Remembering the Battle of the Crater
Wednesday     

Author Kevin Levin discusses the role of the U.S. Colored Troops in the Battle of the Crater, and the way their contributions were remembered in the years following the Civil War. The Battle of the Crater took place July 30, 1864, as part of the Union Army’s siege of Petersburg.

The Civil War: Battle of Fort Stevens 150th Anniversary
Tuesday     

Officials from the National Park Service and Washington, DC, commemorate the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Fort Stevens. The battle took place July 11-12th, 1864, when Confederate forces under Gen. Jubal Early probed Washington, DC’s defenses before turning back. 

The Presidency: Presidents & the CIA
Sunday     

Author and intelligence expert Melvin Goodman describes the history of the relationship between the White House and the Central Intelligence Agency from the Truman years through today. He explains how President Truman's "quiet intelligence arm" became a politicized source of covert actions around the world from the Bay of Pigs invasion to the Iran Contra affair. The National Archives at Kansas City hosted this event. 

A Century Later: Reassessing World War I
Sunday     

World War I officially began on July 28, 1914 when Austria-Hungary declared war on Serbia. Less than a month later, most of Europe had joined the war. As the world marks the centennial of the beginning of the conflict, the National World War I Museum in Kansas City hosts a panel of historians and authors who talk about the causes and effects of the conflict once known as the “war to end all wars.”

Share This Event Via Social Media

Related Resources

Photo Gallery

C-SPAN on Twitter (late 2012)
Questions? Comments? Email us at AmericanHistoryTV@c-span.org