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Treating JFK in Trauma Room One

Dallas
Saturday, November 9, 2013

This November 22nd marks the 50th anniversary of President Kennedy’s assassination. Each weekend this month, we’ll hear eyewitness accounts of the events surrounding that fall day in 1963 that began with the president’s motorcade through the streets of Dallas and ended in national tragedy. In this program, Ronald Jones and Robert McClelland, both members of the Parkland Memorial Hospital team who treated the president and his suspected assassin, Lee Harvey Oswald.  They share their first-hand observations of President Kennedy’s wounds and their medical opinions on both cases.  

The Sixth Floor Museum in Dallas, Texas hosted this hour-long event. The museum is located in the old Texas School Book Depository which employed Oswald. Evidence that shots were fired from the building’s sixth floor was discovered after the assassination.

Updated: Monday, November 11, 2013 at 9:17am (ET)

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Related Resources

Washington Journal (late 2012)