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The Values That Shaped America

Patrick Henry in 1775

Patrick Henry in 1775

San Diego
Saturday, November 2, 2013

Author and historian William White looks at the ideals that shaped the leaders of the American Revolution, and how these principles have influenced American culture since. Mr. White argues that America’s founding values – such as extolling the virtues of freedom yet allowing slavery -- often contradict each other. Because of this, Americans have constantly wrestled with many of the same philosophical questions that confronted the founders, such as whether immigrants can truly become “American,” or whether it is right to break a law one feels is unjust. This event took place in San Diego.
 

Updated: Monday, November 4, 2013 at 11:05am (ET)

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