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The State of the Union: A Look Back

Washington, DC
Saturday, January 25, 2014

President Obama will deliver his State of the Union address on Tuesday, January 28 to a Joint Session of Congress. On American History TV, we look back over five decades to hear from:

President Lyndon Johnson, who on January 8, 1964 announced a “War on Poverty” a month and a half after taking office following President Kennedy’s assassination. 

President Richard Nixon, who on January 27, 1974 pledged to cooperate with the House Judiciary Committee Watergate investigation but who would resign that August.

President Ronald Reagan, who on January 25, 1984 declared, “America is Back,” and outlined four goals to “keep America free, secure and at peace in the eighties.” 

President Bill Clinton, whose stated goals on January 25, 1994 included deficit reduction and reform of the health care and welfare systems.

President George W. Bush, who on January 20, 2004 emphasized the fight against terrorism and the war in Iraq, and called on Congress to renew the Patriot Act.  

Updated: Thursday, January 23, 2014 at 5:54pm (ET)

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