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The St. Louis Passengers & the Holocaust

MS St. Louis

MS St. Louis

Miami Beach
Sunday, June 8, 2014

On May 13, 1939, the transatlantic liner St. Louis departed Hamburg, Germany bound for Havana, Cuba with 938 passengers - almost all were Jews fleeing the Third Reich. The refugees were refused entry into Cuba, then later refused entry into the United States after sailing so close to Miami they could see the city lights. Scott Miller details the fate of the passengers after they returned to Europe and he is joined by other scholars – and a survivor of the Holocaust who was a passenger on the trip – to talk about the refugees and the policies of the countries involved. The Jewish Museum of Florida at Florida International University hosted this event along with the Latin American Jewry Initiative, the Cuban Research Institute, the Latin American and Caribbean Center and the Jewish Studies Initiative. 

Updated: Monday, June 9, 2014 at 1:05pm (ET)

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Washington Journal (late 2012)