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The Presidency: President Johnson's 1964 State of the Union

President Johnson - State of the Union Address (Jan. 8, 1964)

President Johnson - State of the Union Address (Jan. 8, 1964)

Washington, DC
Sunday, January 5, 2014

On January 8, 1964, President Lyndon B. Johnson delivered his first State of the Union address before a Joint Session of Congress.  He declared a “war on poverty” and announced a $97.9 billion budget, calling it “efficient, honest and frugal.”  President Johnson delivered this speech a little over a month after the assassination of President Kennedy on November 22, 1963. This program is from the Lyndon B. Johnson Presidential Library.

Updated: Friday, December 20, 2013 at 5:48pm (ET)

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