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The Presidency: Photographers’ Views of First Ladies

Dallas, Texas
Saturday, April 28, 2012

Three photographers who were on the other side of the lens from Betty Ford, Barbara Bush, and Laura Bush recall their days in the White House—and the images that chronicle the lives and work of these first ladies.

Updated: Monday, April 30, 2012 at 10:57am (ET)

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