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The Presidency: Franklin Roosevelt's Funeral Train

Franklin Roosevelt's Funeral Train (1945)

Franklin Roosevelt's Funeral Train (1945)

Epsom, New Hampshire
Sunday, September 29, 2013

University of New Hampshire lecturer Carl Lindblade tells the story of Franklin Roosevelt’s funeral train, which traveled from Warm Springs, Georgia to Washington, DC and from there on to Hyde Park, New York where the president was laid to rest. FDR used the train for his presidential travels. At his death, it was converted so that the casket - placed atop a platform - could be seen by Americans who lined the route in a last gesture of respect.

Updated: Monday, September 30, 2013 at 10:21am (ET)

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