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The Presidency: Assassination of President Kennedy

President Kennedy in Dallas, Texas (November 22, 1963)

President Kennedy in Dallas, Texas (November 22, 1963)

Springfield, Missouri
Tuesday, December 25, 2012

In the years since President John F. Kennedy was assassinated in Dallas, Texas on November 22, 1963, numerous theories have surfaced about who shot the president and why. In this program, authors David Wrone, Gerald McKnight, David Kaiser and Max Holland dispute each others findings about what really happened in Dallas in 1963.

Updated: Wednesday, December 26, 2012 at 11:46am (ET)

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