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The Presidency: Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg Address

President Lincoln Making his Gettysburg Address

President Lincoln Making his Gettysburg Address

New Haven, Connecticut
Sunday, September 8, 2013

John Burt of Brandeis University discusses the Gettysburg Address and how President Lincoln's precise use of language conveyed his ideas of the central issues at stake in the Civil War. This event took place at Yale University.

Updated: Friday, October 11, 2013 at 6:06pm (ET)

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