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The Politics of Confederate Widowhood

Washington, DC
Saturday, January 18, 2014

The American Historical Association held its annual meeting in Washington, DC in early January and American History TV was there. We talk with University of Georgia doctoral candidate Angela Elder about her research on the politics of Confederate widowhood.

Updated: Friday, January 24, 2014 at 3:21pm (ET)

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