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The Navy and the Battle of New Orleans

1815 Painting by Jean Hyacinthe de Laclotte

1815 Painting by Jean Hyacinthe de Laclotte

Annapolis, Maryland
Saturday, November 16, 2013

Author and historian Gene Allen Smith discusses the U.S. Navy’s involvement in the Battle of New Orleans during the War of 1812. He describes the history of the Navy leading up the battle, and gives a detailed account of the battle itself. Professor Smith argues that the Navy’s involvement was crucial to an American victory, but was overshadowed by Andrew Jackson’s role as General during the battle. This event took place at the United States Naval Academy in Annapolis, Maryland. 

Updated: Tuesday, November 19, 2013 at 11:56am (ET)

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