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The Medal of Honor

Washington, DC
Saturday, February 15, 2014

The Congressional Medal of Honor was first created during the Civil War and is considered the highest award for valor in action against an enemy force. It’s been given to over 3000 servicemen and women since. At the American Veterans Center Annual Conference held in November, we heard from two recipients of the medal—one for his service in Vietnam and the other in Afghanistan. Now retired, they discuss why they entered the military and their memories of receiving the prestigious honor.

Updated: Tuesday, February 18, 2014 at 9:36am (ET)

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