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The Life & Execution of Timothy Webster

Timothy Webster

Timothy Webster

Richmond, Virginia
Saturday, July 19, 2014

Author Corey Recko discusses the life and death of Timothy Webster, a former policeman who spied for the Union during the Civil War. Webster was renowned as the Union's top spy until he was betrayed in 1862, and he was the first spy executed during the war. The Museum of the Confederacy hosted this event. 

Updated: Sunday, July 20, 2014 at 10:17am (ET)

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