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The Great War & American Music

Irving Berlin, Popular 20th Century American Songwriter

Irving Berlin, Popular 20th Century American Songwriter

Washington, DC
Sunday, July 13, 2014

One-hundred years after the beginning of what was called the Great War, author Michael Lasser looks back at the music of World War I. He demonstrates how songs reflected the wartime experiences of soldiers and those back home - from the sweethearts left behind to the soldiers returning from the front. And he argues that the music industry - including songwriters like Irving Berlin - contributed to the war effort by producing patriotic songs. This event was hosted by the President Woodrow Wilson House in Washington, DC. 

Updated: Monday, July 14, 2014 at 9:37am (ET)

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