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The Founding Fathers and Medicine

George Washington on his death bed.

George Washington on his death bed.

New York City
Saturday, May 10, 2014

We hear how forward-thinking Founding Fathers like Benjamin Franklin, James Madison and Thomas Jefferson coped with disease, promoted public health and experimented with new medical treatments. Author Jeanne Abrams also traces the development of medical theory and therapies that were available to the Founders, focusing on the smallpox inoculation. 

Updated: Sunday, May 11, 2014 at 12:46pm (ET)

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