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The Fall of the Berlin Wall

Berlin Wall, 1975

Berlin Wall, 1975

Lexington, Kentucky
Sunday, August 10, 2014

To mark the 25th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall, a panel of historians discusses the larger lessons of the event that transformed world politics. Constructed in 1961, the wall began to fall on November 9, 1989, after months of protests and political liberalization in pro-Soviet Eastern Europe. This event was part of the annual conference of the Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations. 

Updated: Monday, August 11, 2014 at 12:21pm (ET)

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