All Weekend, Every Weekend. On C-SPAN3.

The Face of Lincoln - 1955 Documentary Film

Sculptor & Narrator Merrell Gage

Sculptor & Narrator Merrell Gage

Los Angeles, California
Saturday, October 26, 2013

This 1955 documentary depicts sculptor Merrell Gage telling the life story of Abraham Lincoln while creating a clay bust of the 16th president. The documentary won an academy award for best live action short film in 1956. The film is part of the AV Geeks on-line collection of films.

Updated: Wednesday, February 12, 2014 at 4:50pm (ET)

Related Events

Lectures in History: Lincoln, Slavery & Emancipation
Saturday, April 20, 2013     

President Lincoln issued the preliminary Emancipation Proclamation on September 22nd, 1862. It ordered the emancipation of all slaves in any Confederate state that did not return to the Union by January 1st, 1863. No Confederate states returned, and Lincoln signed and issued the Emancipation Proclamation on January 1, 1863. Professor George Forgie discusses the evolution of Lincoln’s thinking on slavery, and the political and legal factors Lincoln considered when issuing the Emancipation Proclamation. This class is from the University of Texas at Austin.

World Views on Lincoln & Emancipation
Saturday, July 6, 2013     

A discussion examining world reaction to President Lincoln and the Emancipation Proclamation. Historian Richard Carwardine asserts that Lincoln became a polarizing figure abroad as the proclamation was viewed very favorably by some, but was viewed as a threat to others. This event was hosted by the Wilson Center in Washington, DC.

First Ladies: Mary Lincoln
Monday, April 22, 2013     

This week on "First Ladies: Image and Influence," we explore the life of Mary Lincoln, who remains a central figure in our country's history. A political partner of her husband, she endured the loss of 3 of her 4 sons, the assassination of President Lincoln, and the ignomy of being institutionalized by her lone remaining living son, Robert.

Life Portraits: Abraham Lincoln
Sunday, April 21, 2013     

In this program from our 1999 "American Presidents: Life Portraits" series we focused on Abraham Lincoln's life and career. Author David Long and history professor Edna Greene Medford talked about Lincoln's election and presidency. Director of the Lincoln Legal Papers, Cullom Davis, focused on the president's law practice. Linda Norbut Suits, a curator at the Lincoln Home National Historic Site, toured the house and presented many of its artifacts.

The Presidency: Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg Address
Sunday, September 8, 2013     

John Burt of Brandeis University discusses the Gettysburg Address and how President Lincoln's precise use of language conveyed his ideas of the central issues at stake in the Civil War. This event took place at Yale University.

The Presidency: First Ladies & Fashion
Sunday     

The Herbert Hoover Presidential Library hosts author Annette Dunlap as she explores the evolution of first ladies’ fashion. She chronicles the impact fashion had on the public image of the women living in the White House and what their wardrobe choices reveal about the times in which they lived.  

"The Classical Liberal Constitution"
Sunday     

This is a conversation about the new book, “The Classical Liberal Constitution: The Uncertain Quest for Limited Government.” Featured are the book's author, New York University Law School professor Richard Epstein, and University of Pennsylvania Law School professor, Theodore Ruger. They debate the ideas put forth in Epstein's book about the powers of the federal government outlined in the Constitution. The National Constitution Center hosted this event and its president, Jeffrey Rosen, moderated the discussion.  

American Artifacts: JFK Assassination Records
Sunday     

A visit to National Archives in College Park, Maryland to learn about the vast collection of artifacts related to the assassination of President John F. Kennedy.  Martha Wagner Murphy, Head of the Special Access and Freedom of Information Act staff appears to discuss how records are preserved, including the so-called "magic bullet," Oswald's rifle, and the Zapruder film.

Missouri’s German-American Community During WWI
Sunday     

Author and history professor Petra DeWitt talks about the Missouri home front during World War I. German-Americans made up one of the largest immigrant groups in the state at the time and were often scrutinized merely for being German. Professor DeWitt argues that this was not just because of federal doctrines like the Espionage Act and Sedition Act, but that local authorities and individuals were harsher judges of patriotism. The Kansas City Public Library hosted this event.

Reel America: "The City" - 1939
Sunday     

This documentary was originally produced for the 1939-40 New York World’s Fair. The film argues that modern cities are unhealthy, and that planned communities such as the new Greenbelt, Maryland with clean air and safe areas for children to play are a better option. The Library of Congress selected the film for preservation as part of the National Film Registry in 1998.  

Share This Event Via Social Media
C-SPAN's Video Library