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The Face of Lincoln - 1955 Documentary Film

Sculptor & Narrator Merrell Gage

Sculptor & Narrator Merrell Gage

Los Angeles, California
Saturday, October 26, 2013

This 1955 documentary depicts sculptor Merrell Gage telling the life story of Abraham Lincoln while creating a clay bust of the 16th president. The documentary won an academy award for best live action short film in 1956. The film is part of the AV Geeks on-line collection of films.

Updated: Wednesday, February 12, 2014 at 4:50pm (ET)

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