All Weekend, Every Weekend. On C-SPAN3.

The Contenders: James G. Blaine

Lost election of 1884 to Grover Cleveland

Augusta, Maine
Sunday, June 10, 2012

American History TV continues to reair C-SPAN's history series “The Contenders,” which features profiles of key figures who ran for president and lost, but changed political history.

This week, we go back to the election of 1884 and the life, times and political legacy of the Republican Party nominee in that race – James G. Blaine – a former Speaker of the House, Senator from Maine, and Secretary of State for three US Presidents. Blaine is one of the most colorful and divisive figures in post-Reconstruction U.S. politics.

The program originated from the Blaine House, the official residence of the governors of Maine. We talked with historians about the 1884 election, Blaine’s relevancy today, and his long career in politics. We also talked with Maine Governor Paul LePage (R) as he welcomed us into the mansion that served as Blaine’s home in the 19th Century.

Updated: Monday, June 25, 2012 at 11:12am (ET)

Related Events

The Contenders: Henry Clay
Sunday, June 3, 2012     

Historians discuss the role of Henry Clay (1777-1852) in American politics. Known as the "Great Compromiser" but also as "The Dictator," he ran five unsuccessful presidential campaigns. Perhaps the most powerful politician of his time, he served as speaker of the House, U.S. senator, and secretary of state. This is the first of our 14-week series called "The Contenders: They Ran & Lost but Changed Political History."

The Contenders: Eugene Debs
Sunday, June 24, 2012     

American History TV continues to reair C-SPAN's history series “The Contenders,” which features profiles of key figures who ran for president and lost, but changed political history.

The Contenders: Hubert Humphrey
Sunday, August 12, 2012     

American History TV continues to reair C-SPAN's history series “The Contenders,” which features profiles of key figures who ran for president and lost, but changed political history. This week, we focus on the life and career of Hubert H. Humphrey.

The Contenders: George McGovern
Sunday, October 21, 2012     

George McGovern died Sunday, October 21st, 2012, at the age of 90. In 1972, he ran for president as the Democratic Party nominee on an anti-Vietnam war platform and lost in a historic landslide to President Richard Nixon, garnering only 37.5% of the popular vote and even dropping his home-state of South Dakota.

The Contenders: William Jennings Bryan
Sunday, June 17, 2012     

American History TV continues to reair C-SPAN's history series “The Contenders,” which features profiles of key figures who ran for president and lost, but changed political history.

The Contenders: Charles Evans Hughes
Sunday, July 1, 2012     

American History TV continues to reair C-SPAN's history series “The Contenders,” which features profiles of key figures who ran for president and lost, but changed political history. This week, we focus on the election of 1916 and explore the life, legacy, and relevance today of Charles Evans Hughes, the Republican Party nominee in 1916, who served two terms on the Supreme Court, the second time as Chief Justice, two terms as Republican Governor of New York, and Secretary of State in the Harding and Coolidge administrations.

George Washington's "New Room" Restoration
Sunday     

We go to George Washington’s Mount Vernon estate to see what he called the “New Room” – which, after 14 months, $600,000, and extensive scientific and scholarly analysis, is once again a room he would recognize. The Mount Vernon Ladies Association, owners of Washington’s estate since 1858, believe that a room long thought to be used for dining was actually more of a statement room – one designed to project Washington’s own sense of himself as a gentleman farmer, Revolutionary War general and first president of the United States. We get an up close look at Mount Vernon’s grandest room and hear from the team of historians and curators behind its restoration. This event was hosted by Mount Vernon.

Civil Rights Summit - President Speeches
Sunday     

President Obama was joined last week by three predecessors – Jimmy Carter, Bill Clinton and George W. Bush – to mark the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which was signed into law by President Johnson. They each delivered remarks at the Civil Rights Summit hosted by the Lyndon B. Johnson Presidential Library in Austin, Texas.

50th Anniversary of New York Times v. Sullivan
Sunday     

Decided by the Warren Court in 1964, New York Times v. Sullivan was a landmark U.S. Supreme Court case, upholding the freedom of the press and greatly reducing the number of libel lawsuits. Attorneys Lee Levine and law professor Steve Wermiel tell the story of Justice Brennan’s struggle to thwart efforts to overturn the Sullivan case. Their new book is The Progeny: Justice William J. Brennan’s Fight to Preserve the Legacy of New York Times v. Sullivan. The Newseum hosted this event. 

Reel America: "The Treasury Story" 1969
Sunday     

A history of the U.S. Department of the Treasury, which was founded in 1789. Funded by the Treasury Dept., the film includes reenactments and documentary segments of employees engaged in Treasury activities ranging from the IRS to money printing, to the Secret Service.

Share This Event Via Social Media

Photo Gallery

Washington Journal (late 2012)
Questions? Comments? Email us at AmericanHistoryTV@c-span.org