All Weekend, Every Weekend. On C-SPAN3.

The Contenders: James G. Blaine

Lost election of 1884 to Grover Cleveland

Augusta, Maine
Sunday, June 10, 2012

American History TV continues to reair C-SPAN's history series “The Contenders,” which features profiles of key figures who ran for president and lost, but changed political history.

This week, we go back to the election of 1884 and the life, times and political legacy of the Republican Party nominee in that race – James G. Blaine – a former Speaker of the House, Senator from Maine, and Secretary of State for three US Presidents. Blaine is one of the most colorful and divisive figures in post-Reconstruction U.S. politics.

The program originated from the Blaine House, the official residence of the governors of Maine. We talked with historians about the 1884 election, Blaine’s relevancy today, and his long career in politics. We also talked with Maine Governor Paul LePage (R) as he welcomed us into the mansion that served as Blaine’s home in the 19th Century.

Updated: Monday, June 25, 2012 at 11:12am (ET)

Related Events

The Contenders: Henry Clay
Sunday, June 3, 2012     

Historians discuss the role of Henry Clay (1777-1852) in American politics. Known as the "Great Compromiser" but also as "The Dictator," he ran five unsuccessful presidential campaigns. Perhaps the most powerful politician of his time, he served as speaker of the House, U.S. senator, and secretary of state. This is the first of our 14-week series called "The Contenders: They Ran & Lost but Changed Political History."

The Contenders: Eugene Debs
Sunday, June 24, 2012     

American History TV continues to reair C-SPAN's history series “The Contenders,” which features profiles of key figures who ran for president and lost, but changed political history.

The Contenders: Hubert Humphrey
Sunday, August 12, 2012     

American History TV continues to reair C-SPAN's history series “The Contenders,” which features profiles of key figures who ran for president and lost, but changed political history. This week, we focus on the life and career of Hubert H. Humphrey.

The Contenders: George McGovern
Sunday, October 21, 2012     

George McGovern died Sunday, October 21st, 2012, at the age of 90. In 1972, he ran for president as the Democratic Party nominee on an anti-Vietnam war platform and lost in a historic landslide to President Richard Nixon, garnering only 37.5% of the popular vote and even dropping his home-state of South Dakota.

The Contenders: William Jennings Bryan
Sunday, June 17, 2012     

American History TV continues to reair C-SPAN's history series “The Contenders,” which features profiles of key figures who ran for president and lost, but changed political history.

The Contenders: Charles Evans Hughes
Sunday, July 1, 2012     

American History TV continues to reair C-SPAN's history series “The Contenders,” which features profiles of key figures who ran for president and lost, but changed political history. This week, we focus on the election of 1916 and explore the life, legacy, and relevance today of Charles Evans Hughes, the Republican Party nominee in 1916, who served two terms on the Supreme Court, the second time as Chief Justice, two terms as Republican Governor of New York, and Secretary of State in the Harding and Coolidge administrations.

Recorded History of the U.S. Congress
Sunday     

2014 marks the 225th anniversary of the first meeting of the U.S. Congress at Federal Hall in New York City. As part of the annual meeting of the Society for History in the Federal Government, past and present House and Senate historians came together to discuss the state of congressional history. They explored current projects to retrieve old records from individual members of Congress as well as the many differences between the first Congress and Congress today. 

American Artifacts: Making & Breaking Secret Codes
Sunday     

American History TV visits the National Cryptologic Museum - located on the campus of the National Security Agency, just north of Washington, DC - to learn about the making and breaking of secret codes, and their role in U.S. history. This two-part program includes a look at the breaking of the German “Enigma” code and the Japanese diplomatic and naval codes in World War II. 

Theodore Roosevelt and the Great War
Sunday     

Historian J. Lee Thompson discusses Theodore Roosevelt’s views on World War I and his reaction to President Woodrow Wilson’s neutrality policy. Roosevelt’s four sons served in the military during the war – his youngest, a pilot named Quentin, was shot down and killed over France in 1918. Roosevelt never recovered from his son’s death and died six months later in January 1919. Thompson is a Lamar University professor and author of Never Call Retreat: Theodore Roosevelt and the Great War.

Reel America: "Suicide: The Unheard Cry" 1968
Sunday     

This dramatized training film portrays five different types of suicidal personalities so that warning signs can be spotted and help offered before it is too late. Following the 44 minute film, a 10 minute portion of a 2012 C-SPAN Washington Journal regarding the continuing problem of military suicide is shown.

Share This Event Via Social Media

Photo Gallery

C-SPAN's Video Library
Questions? Comments? Email us at AmericanHistoryTV@c-span.org