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The Contenders: Eugene Debs

Terre Haute, Indiana
Sunday, June 24, 2012

American History TV continues to reair C-SPAN's history series “The Contenders,” which features profiles of key figures who ran for president and lost, but changed political history.

This week, we focus on Eugene Debs.  He founded several labor unions and represented the Socialist Party of America as candidate for President.  He ran five times, the last time from prison in 1920 when he received almost a million votes.

This program originially aired on September 30th from the Debs' home in Terre Haute, Indiana.

Updated: Wednesday, June 20, 2012 at 10:06am (ET)

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