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The Contenders: Al Smith

Albany, New York
Sunday, July 8, 2012

American History TV continues to reair C-SPAN's history series “The Contenders,” which features profiles of key figures who ran for president and lost, but changed political history. This week, we focus on the life and career of 1928 Democratic presidential nominee Al Smith. Nicknamed the "Happy Warrior," Al Smith never went to high school or college, yet was speaker of the New York State Assembly and four-term governor.

Updated: Tuesday, July 3, 2012 at 3:14pm (ET)

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