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The Constitutional Significance of Watergate

Watergate Office Building

Watergate Office Building

Orange, California
Saturday, June 23, 2012

June 17th marked the 40th anniversary of the Watergate break-in that ultimately resulted in President Nixon's resignation. To commemorate the anniversary, the Chapman University School of Law held a symposium about Watergate's lasting impact. All this month American History TV is airing highlights of that symposium. This is a discussion on Watergate's constitutional impact and legacy in the context of recent presidential administrations and subsequent political scandals.

Updated: Tuesday, June 26, 2012 at 3:10pm (ET)

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