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The Conspiracy Behind the Lincoln Assassination

Mary Surratt's Former Boarding House in 1890

Mary Surratt's Former Boarding House in 1890

Richmond, VA
Saturday, December 28, 2013

Though John Wilkes Booth fired the fatal shot that killed President Lincoln, he was just one of a group of conspirators that also plotted to assassinate Secretary of State William Seward and Vice-President Andrew Johnson. These attacks were planned at a Washington, DC boarding house owned by Confederate sympathizer Mary Surratt. Author David O. Stewart profiles the Surratts of Maryland in an illustrated talk called “Family of Assassins.” Mr. Stewart discusses the assassination plot and the boarding house, the military trial, and the fates of the conspirators.  He also discusses various assassination conspiracy theories.
 

Updated: Wednesday, February 19, 2014 at 7:51pm (ET)

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