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The Civil War & Its Aftermath

Washington, DC
Saturday, August 18, 2012

In this closing discussion from the U.S. Capitol Historical Society’s 2012 Civil War Symposium, several of the symposium’s presenters take questions from the audience and offer their closing thoughts on the day’s topics, including the role of Congress during the war. They also discuss the end of the war and its immediate aftermath. Albany Law School professor Paul Finkelman moderates.

Updated: Friday, August 24, 2012 at 2:58pm (ET)

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