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The Civil War: Why Didn’t the War End in 1861?

Gettysburg, Pennsylvania
Sunday, February 26, 2012

Lincoln and Civil War scholars discuss why the Civil War didn’t end in 1861, the year that it began. They talked at the Lincoln Forum Symposium in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.

Updated: Monday, February 27, 2012 at 11:43am (ET)

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Washington Journal (late 2012)
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