All Weekend, Every Weekend. On C-SPAN3.

The Civil War: Why Didn’t the War End in 1861?

Gettysburg, Pennsylvania
Sunday, February 26, 2012

Lincoln and Civil War scholars discuss why the Civil War didn’t end in 1861, the year that it began. They talked at the Lincoln Forum Symposium in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.

Updated: Monday, February 27, 2012 at 11:43am (ET)

Related Events

The Civil War in 1861
Monday, January 2, 2012     

Historian Peter Carmichael provides an overview of the Civil War in 1861, including the social, political, and military factors that led to the start of the conflict.

Civil War Planning in 1861
Sunday, August 22, 2010     

In 1861, the North and the South were lining up for battle in the Civil War. Expectations were that the Union had superior resources over the Confederates. War planning in 1861 was the topic presented recently at a conference presented by the U.S. Capitol Historical Society.

The Civil War: The Politics of 1861
Saturday, July 16, 2011     

The Fort Sumter-Fort Moultrie Historical Trust marked the start of America’s bloodiest war at Fort Sumter by inviting leading historians to offer their reflections on the anniversary.  Next, Ed Ayers and Emory Thomas speak on the issue of leadership and the troubling issues of 1861.

President Lincoln in 1861
Sunday, July 24, 2011     

Professor Matthew Pinsker talked about President Abraham Lincoln and his transformation into a wartime commander-in-chief.

The presentation, "Lincoln in 1861: Becoming Commander-in-Chief," was given on Henry Hill, the site of the Battle of Bull Run, also known as First Manassas, as part of a commemoration of the 150th anniversary of the July 21, 1861, battle.

The Civil War: Army Doctrine and Waging War in 1861
Friday, November 25, 2011     

This week on The Civil War, a talk by Wayne Hsieh on the army doctrine employed by  top generals in the Union and Confederate armies, and how it impacted the course of the war.  Hsieh is an assistant professor of history at the U.S. Naval Academy.  He gave this talk in June at the Civil War Institute at Gettysburg College.

Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall
Sunday     

Historians and law professors met at the University of Baltimore Law School to discuss Mick Caouette’s film “Mr. Civil Rights: Thurgood Marshall and the NAACP.” They explored Marshall’s early law career as well as his work in the South to expand voting rights for African Americans. We also hear about his arguments before the U.S. Supreme Court, and how he became the first African American appointed to the highest court in the land.  

The Presidency: John Quincy Adams
Sunday     

A conversation with author Fred Kaplan about his biography, “John Quincy Adams: American Visionary.” Although he was not remembered for being a great president, Fred Kaplan argues that John Quincy Adams was one of the most intellectual commanders in chief, and also the best Secretary of State in American history. The New-York Historical Society hosted this event. 

Herbert Hoover, Henry Wallace & Cold War America
Sunday     

American History TV traveled to the Library of Congress Kluge Center in Washington, DC, which was established in 2000 and endowed by philanthropist John W. Kluge. The center welcomes over 100 scholars every year to pursue their research interests at one of the world's largest libraries. We spoke with Vanderbilt University lecturer Kevin Kim about his upcoming book about Herbert Hoover and Henry Wallace, and their impact on America's Cold War policy.

Naval Warfare in the American Revolution
Sunday     

Historian Dennis Conrad of the Naval History and Heritage Command discusses how strategies used by colonial naval captains contributed to the success of the American Revolution. Mr. Conrad also describes how ships from the colonies – then called the Continental Navy-- fought not just in the Atlantic but also saw action as far away as the Mediterranean Sea and the Indian Ocean. This event was sponsored by the Society of Cincinnati and took place at the Anderson House in Washington D.C. 

American Artifacts: The National Garden
Sunday     

From the founding of the United States, George Washington encouraged the creation of a botanic garden in the nation’s capital that would inspire and educate citizens on plants and their uses. This vision was realized in 1820 when Congress created the U.S. Botanic Garden on the capitol grounds.  The most recent addition, the National Garden, features plants of the Mid-Atlantic, including a Rose Garden and Regional Garden.  Plant curator Bill McLaughlin explained the history and use of some of the country’s indigenous plants by Native Americans, colonials, and others.

Share This Event Via Social Media

Related Resources

C-SPAN's Video Library