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The Civil War West of the Mississippi

"Bacon's military map of the United States," Library of Congress

Fayetteville, Arkansas
Saturday, December 1, 2012

Two history professors talk about aspects of the Civil War in the West - from the Mississippi River to Arizona - including the roles played by Hispanics, and Confederate attempts at westward expansion. The National Park Service and the Arkansas Civil War Sesquicentennial Commission co-hosted this event.

Updated: Wednesday, July 17, 2013 at 11:56am (ET)

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