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The Civil War: Washington, DC During the Civil War

Union troops in front of the U.S. Capitol

Union troops in front of the U.S. Capitol

Washington, DC
Saturday, August 31, 2013

Kenneth Winkle is a history professor at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and the author or “Lincoln’s Citadel: The Civil War in Washington, DC.” In this program, he talks about the transformation of Washington, DC during the Civil War, from a sleepy town with significant pockets of pro-slavery sympathizers, to the bustling nerve center of the Union and a refuge for thousands of freed slaves. The U.S. Capitol Historical Society hosted this event.

Updated: Tuesday, September 3, 2013 at 10:38am (ET)

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