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Understanding the Civil War

Chicago
Saturday, July 20, 2013

Author Thomas Fleming examines how public opinion and propaganda helped spark the nation’s deadliest battle on American soil. He looks at the longstanding tensions between the North and South, and discusses events that heightened fear of a slave rebellion in the southern states. The Pritzker Military Library in Chicago hosted this event. 

Updated: Monday, July 22, 2013 at 12:32pm (ET)

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