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The Civil War: Submarine H.L. Hunley & Her Crews

Kansas City, Missouri
Saturday, May 10, 2014

Author James Speicher talks about the service, sinking and recovery of the Confederate submarine H.L. Hunley, and the three crews who served on the vessel. H.L. Hunley was the first-ever combat submarine to sink a warship. The Kansas City Public Library hosted this event.

Updated: Sunday, May 11, 2014 at 12:45pm (ET)

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