All Weekend, Every Weekend. On C-SPAN3.

The Civil War: Slavery, Emancipation & Reconciliation

"Peace at the End of the Civil War," Allyn Cox, Capitol Rotunda

Gettysburg, Pennsylvania
Saturday, November 17, 2012

History professor Caroline Janney addresses how slavery and emancipation played into the process of post-war reconciliation. She also discusses the experiences and memories of Northern and Southern veterans in the war’s aftermath. Ms. Janney spoke at the 2012 Civil War Institute Conference at Gettysburg College.

Updated: Monday, November 19, 2012 at 11:32am (ET)

Related Events

The Civil War: Military Executions in Stonewall Jackson's Command
Saturday, November 10, 2012     

Peter Carmichael looks at the military executions in General Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson’s command. He talks about the different forms of punishment used under Jackson’s leadership in 1862, and the reactions of Confederate soldiers to these measures. Carmichael is the director of the Civil War Institute at Gettysburg College, and he spoke at the Institute’s 2012 conference.
 

Lectures in History: Women and the Civil War
Saturday, February 26, 2011     

Purdue University professor Caroline Janney teaches a history course on American women in the 18th and 19th centuries. Today’s lecture focuses on the role of women during the Civil War. Janney argues that women provided invaluable services to the soldiers while maintaining the home front.

The Civil War: Union Military Policy in the South
Saturday, November 3, 2012     

Professors and historians discuss Mark Grimsley’s 1997 book, “The Hard Hand of War,” which looks at Union military policies toward Southern civilians. "The Hard Hand of War" was the featured book of the 2012 Civil War Institute Conference at Gettysburg College.

Civil War Blogging
Saturday, October 6, 2012     

History bloggers discuss the role they play in the ongoing conversation about the Civil War. They explain the steps they take to ensure academic credibility and accuracy, and talk about the online interactions they have with people who read their posts. This is from the 2012 Civil War Institute Conference at Gettysburg College.

The Civil War: 1862 Western Theater River Operations
Tuesday, December 25, 2012     

Craig Symonds of the U.S. Naval Academy talks about the war’s Western Theater river operations in 1862. Symonds details the strategies employed by the Union to win several key battles, and credits those victories to the cooperation and combined tactics of General Ulysses S. Grant and Naval Flag Officer Andrew H. Foote. The Civil War Institute at Gettysburg College hosted this event.

The Civil War: Images of Gen. McClellan & Gen. Lee
Saturday, October 13, 2012     

Lincoln Bicentennial Foundation Chair Harold Holzer talks about the photographs, prints, and political cartoons featuring two of the war’s leading generals, George B. McClellan and Robert E. Lee. He explains how the tone of those images changed over the course of the war and beyond, as dictated by each general’s successes and failures both on and off the battlefield. This talk is from the 2012 Civil War Institute Conference at Gettysburg College.

The Civil War: Southern Women's Views of the North & Abraham Lincoln
Saturday, April 28, 2012     

History professor Victoria Ott talks about the views of young, upper-class women of the South toward the North and President Abraham Lincoln. She spoke at the Lincoln Forum Symposium in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.

The Civil War & Its Aftermath
Saturday, August 18, 2012     

In this closing discussion from the U.S. Capitol Historical Society’s 2012 Civil War Symposium, several of the symposium’s presenters take questions from the audience and offer their closing thoughts on the day’s topics, including the role of Congress during the war. They also discuss the end of the war and its immediate aftermath. Albany Law School professor Paul Finkelman moderates.

Emancipation & the Civil War
Tuesday, January 1, 2013     

In this discussion from the 2012 Civil War Institute Conference at Gettysburg College, history professors and bloggers talk about the debates and controversies of emancipation – its timing, its initial results, and its post-war effects into the 20th century.

The Civil War: Emancipation Proclamation
Saturday, October 27, 2012     

Historians discuss the circumstances, outcomes, and ongoing considerations of emancipation. They first place President Lincoln’s September 1862 issuance of the Preliminary Emancipation Proclamation in the context of the War, then broaden out to discuss how Americans think and talk about emancipation and its echoes today. The Smithsonian National Museum of American History hosted this event.

Lectures in History: Emancipation & U.S. Colored Troops
Saturday, August 25, 2012     

History professor Roger Davidson discusses emancipation and U.S. Colored Troops during the Civil War. Professor Davidson explains how African Americans used the disorder caused by the Civil War to escape enslavement. He also details how former slaves offered their services to Union forces to help bring about the end of slavery. This class took place at Coppin State University in Baltimore, Maryland.

Geography of Emancipation
Saturday, October 30, 2010     

Civil War historian Gary Gallagher and University of Richmond president Edward Ayers deliver the keynote address at the 2010 meeting of the Society of Civil War Historians. Their presentation is called "Fighting & Freedom: United States Military Forces and the Geography of Emancipation."

The Civil War: Emancipation During the War
Saturday, August 6, 2011     

The Emancipation Proclamation is considered to be one of the most important documents in American history.  The U.S. Capitol Historical Society presented a symposium on “Emancipation during the Civil War” on Capitol Hill.  Albany Law School professor Paul Finkelman spoke about Abraham Lincoln and the constitutionality of the proclamation.

Frederick Douglass and Emancipation
Saturday, August 6, 2011     

The most prominent civil rights activist in the 19th century was Frederick Douglass. His relationship with Abraham Lincoln helped convince the President that he must act on the issue of emancipation. History professor Diane Barnes spoke about Douglass at the annual spring symposium of the U.S. Capitol Historical Society.

Abraham Lincoln & Emancipation
Sunday, July 10, 2011     

Historian Michael Burlingame delivers a presentation on Abraham Lincoln and the process by which Lincoln came to embrace the liberation of slaves.  His lecture was part of the U.S. Capitol Historical Society’s symposium on Emancipation during the Civil War.  This program is forty-five minutes.

The Civil War: Emancipation and the Union
Saturday, July 2, 2011     

On American History TV’s The Civil War: Historian Gary Gallagher argues that the primary motive of the North during the War was to preserve the “Union”—not to emancipate the slaves. However, Union forces “should” be credited with moving emancipation forward.  He presented the keynote address at a symposium on “Emancipation during the Civil War” with the U-S Capitol Historical Society.

Lectures in History: Slavery, Secession & the Civil War
Saturday, October 13, 2012     

History professor Susan Schulten discusses the causes of America's Civil War, including President Abraham Lincoln's refusal to allow slavery to expand into new territories. Professor Schulten explains that President Lincoln refused to recognize the Confederacy as legitimate and viewed secession as illegal. This class took place at the University of Denver.

President Abraham Lincoln & the Expansion of Slavery
Sunday, August 8, 2010     

Abraham Lincoln’s opposition to the expansion of slavery in the West was a key factor on his decision to enter national politics. Pulitzer-prize winning historian James McPherson spoke about Lincoln’s connection to the West at the Lincoln Forum in Gettysburg.
Share This Event Via Social Media

Photo Gallery

Washington Journal (late 2012)