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The Civil War: Shiloh Battlefield Tour

Battle of Shiloh - The Hornet's Nest

Battle of Shiloh - The Hornet's Nest

Shiloh National Military Park, Hardin County, TN
Saturday, April 7, 2012

The Civil War Battle of Shiloh took place April 6th and 7th, 1862 in Hardin County, Tennessee, and resulted in a Union victory over Confederate forces attempting to defend two major western railroads servicing the strategically important Mississippi Valley region. Nearly 110,000 troops took part in the fighting, which produced almost 24,000 casualties, making it the bloodiest battle to that point in U.S. history. American History TV visited Shiloh National Military Park, where Stacy Allen, the Park's Chief Ranger, gave us a tour of the battlefield.

Updated: Friday, July 27, 2012 at 12:59pm (ET)

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