All Weekend, Every Weekend. On C-SPAN3.

The Civil War: Shenandoah Valley Campaigns of 1862 & 1864

Sheridan's March Up the Shenandoah Valley, Harper's Weekly, Oct. 22, 1864

Sheridan's March Up the Shenandoah Valley, Harper's Weekly, Oct. 22, 1864

Lexington, Virginia
Saturday, August 18, 2012

Two historians talk about the Shenandoah Valley Campaigns of 1862 and 1864, which involved some of the fiercest fighting of the War. This is the fourth in a series of sessions from a conference organized by the Virginia Civil War Sesquicentennial Commission. The theme of this year’s gathering was Leadership and Generalship in the Civil War. The Virginia Military Institute hosted the conference.

Updated: Saturday, August 4, 2012 at 11:40am (ET)

Related Events

Gen. Robert E. Lee & the Army of Northern Virginia
Saturday, October 20, 2012     

Two historians discuss Robert E. Lee’s leadership during the Civil War. They consider Lee’s education, his work as a general, and his ability to maintain troop morale under challenging circumstances. This is the second in a series of sessions we’re airing from a conference organized by the Virginia Civil War Sesquicentennial Commission. The theme of this year’s gathering was Leadership and Generalship in the Civil War. The Virginia Military Institute hosted the conference.

The Presidency: Ulysses S. Grant in National Memory
Sunday, June 19, 2011     

On the occasion of the 189th birthday of Ulysses S. Grant, historian Bryan Le Beau reflected on the changing fortunes of the Civil War General and former President of the United States in national memory. Le Beau spoke at the National Archives branch in Kansas City, Missouri.

The Civil War: Conflicted Loyalties of Robert E. Lee
Saturday, May 28, 2011     

Robert E. Lee was a conflicted man when he stood before the Virginia House of Delegates in 1861 to accept command of the state’s military forces. Exactly 150 years later, historian Gary Gallagher spoke on the same spot about Lee’s resignation from the U.S. Army and his competing loyalties--between his country and that of Virginia.

Lectures in History: Generalship of Ulysses S. Grant
Saturday, April 28, 2012     

U.S. Naval Academy History Professor Wayne Hsieh examines the Generalship of Ulysses S. Grant.  This class is part of a course called, "The American Way of War."

Lectures in History: Generalship of Robert E. Lee
Saturday, April 28, 2012     

U.S. Naval Academy History Professor Wayne Hsieh examines the Generalship of Robert E. Lee.  This class is part of a course called, "The American Way of War."

Leadership of Abraham Lincoln & Jefferson Davis
Saturday, May 26, 2012     

Two historians discuss the wartime leadership styles of Abraham Lincoln and Jefferson Davis. This is the first in a series of sessions from a conference organized by the Virginia Civil War Sesquicentennial Commission. The theme of this year’s gathering was Leadership and Generalship in the Civil War. The event took place at the Virginia Military Institute in Lexington, Virginia.

The Life & Execution of Timothy Webster
Saturday     

Author Corey Recko discusses the life and death of Timothy Webster, a former policeman who spied for the Union during the Civil War. Webster was renowned as the Union's top spy until he was betrayed in 1862, and he was the first spy executed during the war. The Museum of the Confederacy hosted this event. 

Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr. & the Civil War
Saturday     

Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr. served in the Union Army from 1861-64 and was wounded three times in battle. In this program, a panel of scholars looks at the impact of the Civil War on the life of the future Supreme Court Justice, including how his time as a soldier shaped his law career. The Supreme Court Historical Society hosted this discussion.

Washington’s Civil War Forts and Parks
Saturday, July 12, 2014     

Historians and park officials discuss the development of Washington, DC’s Civil War forts, the role they played in the war, and how they’ve been preserved for the past 150 years. These earthen defenses, especially Fort Stevens, were vital in keeping the nation’s capital under Union control during the war. This event was co-hosted by the National Archives and the National Capital Planning Council.

The Civil War: Battles of Monocacy & Fort Stevens
Saturday, July 12, 2014     

Historian and journalist Marc Leepson took C-SPAN on a tour of several battlefields in Maryland and Washington, D.C., to tell the story of two July 1864 battles that threatened the U.S. Capitol. On July 11 and 12, 1864, President Lincoln observed the fighting at Fort Stevens and was nearly shot by a Confederate sharpshooter. Mr. Leepson is the author of the 2007 book "Desperate Engagement: How a Little-Known Civil War Battle Saved Washington, D.C., and Changed American History."

Share This Event Via Social Media
C-SPAN on Twitter (late 2012)
Questions? Comments? Email us at AmericanHistoryTV@c-span.org