All Weekend, Every Weekend. On C-SPAN3.

The Civil War: Shenandoah Valley Campaigns of 1862 & 1864

Sheridan's March Up the Shenandoah Valley, Harper's Weekly, Oct. 22, 1864

Sheridan's March Up the Shenandoah Valley, Harper's Weekly, Oct. 22, 1864

Lexington, Virginia
Saturday, August 18, 2012

Two historians talk about the Shenandoah Valley Campaigns of 1862 and 1864, which involved some of the fiercest fighting of the War. This is the fourth in a series of sessions from a conference organized by the Virginia Civil War Sesquicentennial Commission. The theme of this year’s gathering was Leadership and Generalship in the Civil War. The Virginia Military Institute hosted the conference.

Updated: Saturday, August 4, 2012 at 11:40am (ET)

Related Events

Gen. Robert E. Lee & the Army of Northern Virginia
Saturday, October 20, 2012     

Two historians discuss Robert E. Lee’s leadership during the Civil War. They consider Lee’s education, his work as a general, and his ability to maintain troop morale under challenging circumstances. This is the second in a series of sessions we’re airing from a conference organized by the Virginia Civil War Sesquicentennial Commission. The theme of this year’s gathering was Leadership and Generalship in the Civil War. The Virginia Military Institute hosted the conference.

The Presidency: Ulysses S. Grant in National Memory
Sunday, June 19, 2011     

On the occasion of the 189th birthday of Ulysses S. Grant, historian Bryan Le Beau reflected on the changing fortunes of the Civil War General and former President of the United States in national memory. Le Beau spoke at the National Archives branch in Kansas City, Missouri.

The Civil War: Conflicted Loyalties of Robert E. Lee
Saturday, May 28, 2011     

Robert E. Lee was a conflicted man when he stood before the Virginia House of Delegates in 1861 to accept command of the state’s military forces. Exactly 150 years later, historian Gary Gallagher spoke on the same spot about Lee’s resignation from the U.S. Army and his competing loyalties--between his country and that of Virginia.

Lectures in History: Generalship of Ulysses S. Grant
Saturday, April 28, 2012     

U.S. Naval Academy History Professor Wayne Hsieh examines the Generalship of Ulysses S. Grant.  This class is part of a course called, "The American Way of War."

Lectures in History: Generalship of Robert E. Lee
Saturday, April 28, 2012     

U.S. Naval Academy History Professor Wayne Hsieh examines the Generalship of Robert E. Lee.  This class is part of a course called, "The American Way of War."

Leadership of Abraham Lincoln & Jefferson Davis
Saturday, May 26, 2012     

Two historians discuss the wartime leadership styles of Abraham Lincoln and Jefferson Davis. This is the first in a series of sessions from a conference organized by the Virginia Civil War Sesquicentennial Commission. The theme of this year’s gathering was Leadership and Generalship in the Civil War. The event took place at the Virginia Military Institute in Lexington, Virginia.

War Crimes Trial of Henry Wirz
Saturday     

Swiss-born Confederate Captain Henry Wirz was in charge of the Andersonville prisoner-of-war camp, where some 13,000 of approximately 45,000 Union prisoners died while being held there. Author and law professor Paul Finkelman discusses the military trial and execution of Henry Wirz and the concept of war crimes that were established as a result of the trial. This talk is a portion of the 2014 Civil War Symposium hosted by the U.S. Capitol Historical Society.

The Civil War: Confederate Gen. John Bell Hood
Saturday     

Stephen Hood discusses his book on the military career, personal life and legacy of Confederate General John Bell Hood. The author -- a distant relative of the general -- analyzes John Bell Hood’s actions at Gettysburg, Chickamauga and Antietam by delving into letters and medical records recently released by Hood’s descendents. He says that many of the Hood’s controversial acts are clarified or redeemed through an examination of the documents. 

The Life & Execution of Timothy Webster
Saturday, July 19, 2014     

Author Corey Recko discusses the life and death of Timothy Webster, a former policeman who spied for the Union during the Civil War. Webster was renowned as the Union's top spy until he was betrayed in 1862, and he was the first spy executed during the war. The Museum of the Confederacy hosted this event. 

Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr. & the Civil War
Saturday, July 19, 2014     

Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr. served in the Union Army from 1861-64 and was wounded three times in battle. In this program, a panel of scholars looks at the impact of the Civil War on the life of the future Supreme Court Justice, including how his time as a soldier shaped his law career. The Supreme Court Historical Society hosted this discussion.

Share This Event Via Social Media
C-SPAN Gifts (late 2012)
Questions? Comments? Email us at AmericanHistoryTV@c-span.org