All Weekend, Every Weekend. On C-SPAN3.

The Civil War: Seven Days' Battles

Richmond, Virginia
Saturday, August 4, 2012

University of Virginia history professor Gary Gallagher talks about the Seven Days’ Battles, a series of conflicts fought during the last week of June 1862. In those battles, Confederate forces under Robert E. Lee thwarted George B. McClellan’s Army of the Potomac in the Union attempt to take the Confederate capital of Richmond. Professor Gallagher argues that, in many ways, the Seven Days’ Battles were more of a turning point in the Civil War than was the Battle of Gettysburg a year later. The Virginia Historical Society hosted this event.
 

Updated: Monday, August 6, 2012 at 10:12am (ET)

Related Events

The Civil War: President Lincoln and General McClellan
Saturday, July 30, 2011     

Following the defeat of Union forces at the Battle of Bull Run, Abraham Lincoln summoned Major General George B. McClellan to replace Irvin McDowell as commander of the Army of the Potomac.  He would soon rise to the level of General-in-Chief of the Federal armies. 

Gen. Robert E. Lee & the Army of Northern Virginia
Saturday, October 20, 2012     

Two historians discuss Robert E. Lee’s leadership during the Civil War. They consider Lee’s education, his work as a general, and his ability to maintain troop morale under challenging circumstances. This is the second in a series of sessions we’re airing from a conference organized by the Virginia Civil War Sesquicentennial Commission. The theme of this year’s gathering was Leadership and Generalship in the Civil War. The Virginia Military Institute hosted the conference.

Lectures in History: Generalship of Robert E. Lee
Saturday, April 28, 2012     

U.S. Naval Academy History Professor Wayne Hsieh examines the Generalship of Robert E. Lee.  This class is part of a course called, "The American Way of War."

The Civil War: Cincinnati’s Black Brigade & the Abolition Movement
Saturday, July 14, 2012     

Two speakers make presentations at the U.S. Capitol Historical Society’s 2012 Civil War Symposium. First, author Nikki Taylor addresses the issue of citizenship among free African Americans, and the story of Cincinnati’s Black Brigade. Then, history professor Diane Barnes talks about the abolition movement.

Lectures in History: Emancipation & the Civil War
Saturday, July 14, 2012     

History Professor Chandra Manning looks at the Emancipation Proclamation and the escalation of the Civil War. Professor Manning also examines the role that black soldiers played in the Union victory. The class took place at Georgetown University in Washington, DC.

The Civil War: Studying Military History
Saturday, July 14, 2012     

History professor Gary Gallagher speaks about the importance of studying military history in the last of a series of sessions from a conference organized by the Virginia Civil War Sesquicentennial Commission. The theme of this year’s gathering was Leadership and Generalship in the Civil War. The Virginia Military Institute hosted the conference.

The Civil War: Monitoring & Financing the War
Saturday, July 7, 2012     

Two speakers make presentations at the U.S. Capitol Historical Society’s 2012 Civil War Symposium. First, author Fergus Bordewich talks about the Joint Committee on the Conduct of the War, the Congressional panel created to monitor Northern military affairs. Then, economics professor Jenny Bourne talks about how the war was financed.

The Civil War: Abraham Lincoln & Jefferson Davis
Saturday, June 30, 2012     

The New-York Historical Society hosts this discussion with historians Harold Holzer, James McPherson, and William Davis, who talk about Abraham Lincoln and Jefferson Davis as opposing Civil War commanders-in-chief.

The Civil War: The Life of Winnie Davis
Saturday     

Author Heath Hardage Lee discusses the life of Winnie Davis, daughter of Confederate President Jefferson Davis. Lee describes Winnie’s life growing up in the Confederate White House in Richmond, her post-war rise to popularity in both the North and the South, and her writing career. The Museum of the Confederacy hosted this event. 

Historical Accuracy of the Movie “Lincoln”
Friday     

Dickinson College professor Matthew Pinsker dissects Stephen Spielberg’s movie “Lincoln,” analyzing what is fact and what is Hollywood fiction. Professor Pinsker goes into detail about the historical significance of the events the movie portrays, but also highlights areas where Mr. Spielberg exercised his artistic freedom. This talk is a portion of the 2014 Civil War Symposium hosted by the U.S. Capitol Historical Society. 

Share This Event Via Social Media

Related Resources

C-SPAN Gifts (late 2012)